The Nature Of Fasting

The Nature Of Fasting

Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyyah | Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 46 | Size: 2 MB
This is a translation one of the smaller publications from the words of Shaykh Al-Islam Taqiuddin Ahmad bin ‘Abdul-Halim Ibn Taymiyyah. It has been published in this form a variety of times with a number of minor additions to the text under the title, “Haqiqatus- Siyam,” or “The Nature of Fasting.” This book will help the reader better understand the fine points about fasting. What is the nature of the things that break the fast? What are the rules by which one can know the difference between what breaks the fast and what does not? These question are more answered by Shaykh Al-Islam Ibn Taymiyyah in his discussion of the Nature of Fasting.

Table of Contents:

THE NATURE OF THINGS THAT BREAK THE FAST
THE NATURE OF THINGS THAT DO NOT BREAK THE FAST
Questions and Answers
Fasting the Cloudy Day and the Day of Doubt
Fasting and Shortening the Prayer for the Traveler
Fasting for the Traveler: Better or Worse?
Must One Intend to Fast the Night Before?
Is the Intention Necessary Every Day?
How Fast is the Fast to be Broken?
Eating After the Earlier Adhan
If Fasting Causes Fainting and Madness
The Case of A Pregnant Woman

Publishers Note

All praise is due to Allah, and may He grant peace and blessings upon His Last Messenger Muhammad.

This is a translation one of the smaller publications from the works of Shaykh Al-Islam Taqiuddin Ahmad bin ‘Abdul-Halim Ibn Taymiyyah. It has been published in this form a variety of times with a number of minor additions to the text under the title, “Hagigatus-Siyam,” or, “The Nature of Fasting.” We have revised our version to meet the source section of Majmu’ AI-Fatawa (25:219) from where it appears that the original booklet – with the exception of the questions, of which most appear on earlier pages – has been taken. We have inserted brackets to signify the additions, which earlier publishers probably took from other sections of his writings. We have also added brief references to the text for the Hadiths. I would like to express gratitude to brother Ebrahim Aly Ma’rouf for the original translation of this booklet, and the Darussalam staff for their editing and layout work.

In the end all praise is due to Allah, and upon Him we depend.

Abdul-Malik Mujahid, General Manager , Darussalam

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70 Matters Related To Fasting

70 Matters Related To Fasting

Sheikh Muhammed Salih Al-Munajjid | Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 28 | Size: 1 MB
Allah has blessed His slaves with certain seasons of goodness, in which hasanat (rewards for good deeds) are multiplied, sayyi’at (bad deeds) are forgiven, people’s status is raised and the hearts of the believers turn to their Lord. Those who purify themselves attain success and those who corrupt themselves fail.

As the status of this act of worship is so high, it is essential to learn the Ahkam (rulings) that have to do with the month of fasting, so that the Muslim will know what is obligatory, in order to do it, what is haram, in order to avoid it, and what is permissible, so that he does not need to subject himself to hardship by depriving himself of it.

This book is a good summary of the rulings, etiquettes, and Sunnah of fasting.

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Why Do Muslims Fast?

Why Do Muslims Fast?

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Dr. Abu Ameenah Bilal Philips
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 11 | Size: 1 MB

Most of us who are fighting the battle of the bulge have experimented with some form of fasting, like an all fruit fast, a water fast or an sugar-free fast, you name it. But what many may find rather strange and intriguing is a whole nation of people; be it man or woman, old or young, rich or poor; going completely without food and drink from dawn to dusk for a whole month – Ramadan. What is the significance of Ramadan beyond shortened work hours? Is it not a very harsh practice? Is it merely a time when Muslims sleep and fast and hardly work all day; and eat, drink, enjoy and stay awake all night? What really is the spirit of Ramadan?

Fasting Prescribed in All Religions

In English “fasting” means to abstain from food or from certain kinds of food voluntarily, as an observance of a holy day or as a token of grief, sorrow, or repentance.[1] This practice can be found in most of the major religions of the world. For example, in Hinduism, fasting in Sanskrit is called upavaasa. Devout Hindus observe fasting on special occasions as a mark of respect to their personal gods or as a part of their penance. Most devout Indians fast regularly or on special occasions like festivals. On such days they do not eat at all, eat once or make do with fruits or a special diet of simple food.[2] For Jews, the day Yom Kippur (“Day of Atonement”) is the last of the Ten Days of Repentance observed on the 10th of Tishri. It is forbidden on that day to eat, drink, wash, wear leather, or have sexual relations. In addition, prohibitions on labor similar to those on the Sabbath are in force.[3] It should also be noted that Moses (peace be upon him) is recorded in the Torah to have fasted.

“And he was there with the Lord 40 days and 40 nights, he neither ate bread not drank water.” (Exodus 34:28)

For Catholics among Christians, Lent is the major season of fasting, imitative of the forty-day fast of Jesus (peace be upon him). In the fourth century it was observed as six weeks of fasting before Easter or before Holy Week. It was adjusted to forty days of actual fasting in most places in the seventh century.[4] Jesus (peace be upon him) is recorded in the Gospels to have fasted like Moses.

“And he fasted 40 days and 40 nights, and afterward he was hungry.” (Matthew 4:2 & Luke 4:2)

It is in this context that God states in the Quran: “O believers! Fasting has been prescribed for you as it was prescribed for those before you in order that you become more conscious of God.” (Quran 2:183)

Among the Best Righteous Deeds

Although in most religions, fasting is for expiation of sin or atonement for sin, in Islam it is primarily to bring one closer to God, as stated in the above-mentioned verse. Since, Godconsciousness is the prerequisite for righteousness, great stress is placed on fasting in Islam. Thus, it is not surprising to find that when Prophet Muhammad, may the mercy and blessings of God be upon him, was asked:    Continue reading →